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Posts Tagged ‘Literature Seminar with Rea Berg’

Dear Readers,

I am very excited to announce a new, fun, exciting twist on my regular Summer Literature Soirée!  This summer, the lovely Greta Eskridge of #maandpamodern fame will be joining me to enhance and enrich our time together!  Greta (if you don’t know her–and you should) hosts the very popular At Home Podcast where her lively personality, her disarming humility, and her honesty and vulnerability have earned her a very faithful following!  Greta is one of a few voices in home schooling today that is actually a home school graduate herself (as well as a college graduate–which she did not do at home), and I know you will love her as much as I do!

This year, rather than hosting this at my home, as I have done for the last 6 years (yes, it’s been six!), Greta and I have secured the beautiful Monday Club on Monterey in San Luis Obispo.  This historic building was built by California’s first woman architect–the remarkable Julia Morgan.  Its warm Spanish Colonial style architecture will provide a hospitable and lovely venue for our day of discussing history, literature, poetry and nature!  I so hope you can join us!

And on a side note–we will be serving our local favorite–Scout Coffee, and a delicious sandwich and salad luncheon created my the master Southern Italian chefs at Giuseppe’s Bistro!  So, make plans to join us for a festive day of laughter, learning, literature and life!  Here are the details and here is the link to register:

Rea and Greta’s Literature Soirée
July 22, 2017
9am to 4pm
The Monday Club, San Luis Obispo, CA
Cost: Early Bird $60 by May 31st
$65 after June 1

A free COFFEE MEET UP with Rea and Greta will be held the night before the Soirée at Scout Coffee on Foothill Avenue. Come at 6:30 pm. Cost of admission is a cup of coffee or tea!  Come get a chance to mingle with lots of like-minded mamas and enjoy San Luis Obispo’s favorite coffee hang-out at the same time!

 

Teaching History Through Literature by Rea Berg

Our ancient predecessors, sitting by candlelight or lamplight, reading history, actually read history through literature.  There simply was no other way to study history–as there were no textbooks until the Modern era. History has effectively been taught through literature since ancient times.  Just the last century or so has this vibrant subject been robbed of its human connection by the ubiquitous textbook.  As Neil Postman urges in his book, The End of Education, those who desire to improve teaching ought to get rid of all textbooks which, in his opinion are “the enemies of education, instruments for promoting dogmatism and trivial learning” (116).  Replacing the history textbook with literature not only restores this discipline to its historic roots, but also reinvigorates it with its inherent passion, human interest, and wonder. In the long term, children who are exposed to the best books from an early age, learn the adventure, drama, and poetry of a well-told tale, and discover the truth of Ralph Waldo Emerson’s maxim, “All history is biography.”

The Power of Poetry

 by Greta Eskridge

“Poetry: the best words in the best order.”
Samuel Taylor Coleridge



For many of us teachers, poetry is an afterthought. There are so many books to get through, novels, historical books, texts about science and geography, that we struggle to find room for poetry. If there is any time left at the end of a school day or week, we might fit in a poem or two. But we might not. Because we aren’t sure that poetry matters all that much.
However, when we don’t expose our children to poetry we are doing them a great disservice. The author W. Somerset Maughman says, “the crown of literature is poetry.” 
Poetry requires a different kind of reading and thinking from us than prose does. It makes us work a little bit harder. It exposes us to the best language, because it the poet chooses each word so carefully.
In this session, Greta will share with you many ways to bring poetry into your school day. She’ll give you everything from lesson ideas, to lists of best-loved childhood poems, and poetry collections. She’ll share a bit of her childhood exposure to poetry, or more accurately, the lack thereof. And what it was that finally brought poetry to life for her.
More than anything, Greta wants you to come way from this session feeling excited about poetry and inspired to add it to your everyday life. After all,  “teaching poetry is one important way to help children become human beings who are fully awake to the world.” Megan McNamer

Exploring the Great Writers of History for Children–A Practicum on Teaching History Through Literature by Rea Berg

At the turn of the twentieth century, a publication movement arose that recognized the value of children having excellent picture books and history books that dealt with serious subjects, no longer just fairy tales and fantasy–but history and biography.  Recognized experts in their fields were commissioned to write excellent books for children. This movement coincided with an artistic flowering committed to exposing children to the beauty of art at a young age. Combined, these movements resulted in a golden era of children’s literature that provided children (and their parents) with extraordinary books that were not only intellectually satisfying, but also visually pleasing.  This session will explore a number of these works and the ways in which these books can build a rich historical and literary curriculum for you and your students.  

Learning to Love Nature Through Literature by Greta Eskridge

“He does not despise real woods because he reads of enchanted woods; the reading makes all the real woods a little enchanted.” CS Lewis



One might not automatically make a connection between nature and literature. Spending time in nature calls to mind hiking trails and backpacks, dirt and bugs. While literature makes us think of academia, deep discussions, or at the very least, curling up in a comfy spot to get lost in the pages of Jane Austin.
However, many wonderful works of literature are rich in nature, and the writers of these works were great nature lovers. They understood the powerful teacher that nature and literature can be together, engaging us in the wonder of the natural sciences in a way a textbooks never could.  
When we read these works of literature with our children, we expose them to the beauty and marvels of nature in a powerful way.
In this session, Greta will share her own journey of falling in love with nature through reading great books. And she’ll explain why she has made nature study through literature such a priority in her own children’s education.
Greta will share practical tips on how to make nature come alive through books. As well as ways to get more nature into your lives, even if the idea of a hike with your children leaves you feeling slightly panicked. 
You’ll come away from this session with an extensive list of books that are rich in nature. Best of all, you’ll be inspired to add more nature and literature to your school days.



 

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Dear Readers,

On September 18th, in San Luis Obispo, I’ll be offering my very first day-long seminar on Children’s Literature.  If you would like to attend you can register here.  What I’d like to offer is an opportunity to win a free pass to the seminar (a $30 value) by subscribing to the blog. Or, if you’ve already subscribed to the blog, you can be entered to win the free pass by getting a friend to subscribe!  For every 10 new subscriptions I’ll throw in an additional free pass which will increase your chances of winning.  Now for those of you that live outside of a reasonable driving distance to San Luis Obispo, I will offer you the option of 5 CDs of my most recent presentations at the CHEA convention in July, or a free Genevieve Foster title. (See http://www.bfbooks.com for all available Genevieve Foster titles).  Another additional option, if you live in the Southern California area you can win your pass to attend the upcoming literature training seminar there, which is slated to occur mid-October.  So here’s what you need to do:  if you’re already a subscriber, get a friend to sign up and both your name and your friend’s name will be entered into the drawing.  This offer will be available through the end of August for the San Luis Obispo Seminar and through September for the Southern California Seminar. Be sure to let me know which contest you’d like to enter. Then leave a comment here with your email address (and your friend’s) and I will respond back to you confirming that I’ve entered you into the contest.

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